The Reason I’m Here, New Early Support Video.

Early Support has commissioned a series of films to show our principles across the country. These films demonstrate the work that is going on out there, including the work other delivery partners are doing. Signpost Inclusion with Solihull Council and the Renewal Family Centre assisted with the making of one of these, not least by organising and promoting a family event around which to base much of the filming. The concept of the film was devised by the film’s Producer, Nidge Dyer with Fiona Holmes and Dave Howard.


Being Listened To, Being Heard.

Although my working life has been related to issues of inclusion to one extent or another, I am new to the world of Early Support. The conversations that I had in the making of the short video, Being Listened To, Being Heard were therefore eye opening, both because of the personal impact that results from a poor experience, and because of the positive difference good practice can make.

We can all doubtless recite mantras regarding the importance of professionals and practitioners actively listening to people that they are working with and attempting to help, but hearing parents and young people talk of their personal and isolating experiences brings the message home. The chance to then hear of the simplest of ways in which the negative can be made positive should I think provide those working to implement the Early Support principles with reassurance that a) their work is needed, and b) it makes a difference.

Being Listened To, Being Heard.

Although my working life has been related to issues of inclusion to one extent or another, I am new to the world of Early Support. The conversations that I had in the making of the short video, Being Listened To, Being Heard were therefore eye opening, both because of the personal impact that results from a poor experience, and because of the positive difference good practice can make.

We can all doubtless recite mantras regarding the importance of professionals and practitioners actively listening to people that they are working with and attempting to help, but hearing parents and young people talk of their personal and isolating experiences brings the message home. The chance to then hear of the simplest of ways in which the negative can be made positive should I think provide those working to implement the Early Support principles with reassurance that a) their work is needed, and b) it makes a difference.